Why Strive for Something Better, When Lichen Will Do

Why Strive for Something Better, When Lichen Will Do

Lichen on a hay-rack in Bohinj, Slovenia, Europe

The key to a peaceful life is taking control of your wishes. One extreme is trying to make all your wishes true. That way you are unfocused, constantly drawn away from important things and in danger of losing what really matters in life, like health or family bliss for example. The other extreme is trying to achieve nirvana or the state without wishes. Nirvana is the minute before dying in your last incarnation, so take it easy – you can have some wishes, just make sure you don’t overdo it. Some things are not meant to be, thus you should let go of some wishes. Another common mistake is having too many wishes at the same time. Compare my blogs: Be careful what you wish for, My true self, Love is the answer.

Enough theory, let me tell you a story. In Slovenia it is snow on the ground that people expect around New Year’s Eve and if there isn’t any snow, the majority complains. The other day it was cloudy, no snow, no leaves, no flowers. You could call it a dull day. But the thing is: there is always something interesting to see during nature walks. This time I chose to concentrate on lichen on trees and hay-racks. Close up they revealed a wonderful intensity of color (see photo).

I chose to be happy, although I could have had the wish for a snowed-in landscape and remained miserable till the rest of the day. I was not born that way, however. I had to make many mistakes, before my ‘beast got balanced’ and I have to keep ‘Balancing the Beast’ like everyone else.

Take care,

Helena Smole

2 Responses to “ “Why Strive for Something Better, When Lichen Will Do”

  1. Bridget Kostello says:

    Helena,
    I love your continued focus on good choices instead of just wishing. Do you have any advice for when your mind is highly resistant to wanting to choose a more positive path?

  2. Helena Smole says:

    Bridget,

    a rebellious mind is usually a restless mind. Thus I would suggest prayer or some other sort of meditation, like the one in yoga. Once the mind is calm, it will choose the right activity without excuses. Meditation has to be daily practice.

    When developing a new daily routine, one has to be optimistic and forgive oneself for having left a day or two out. Even if one has had a ‘lazy month’, this is not a reason to give up. Always look ahead. Don’t say to yourself: “I am so lazy.” This only draws energy out of you. Say instead: “No matter how lazy I have been the last month, now I will meditate.” With years a routine develops. It grows into a habit like the habit of brushing your teeth. Remember how often parents have to tell their children to brush their teeth. It takes the same amount of patience and perseverance, when we try to learn something as grown-ups.

    Take care,
    Helena

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